Ethan White, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation and the Informatics Institute

 

Ethan directs the Data Intensive Ecology Lab at the University of Florida, which uses large scale ecological, remote sensing, and climate data, to develop models and make forecasts for ecological syst

Ethan White, Ph.D.
 

Research Description

Ethan directs the Data Intensive Ecology Lab at the University of Florida, which uses large scale ecological, remote sensing, and climate data, to develop models and make forecasts for ecological systems. His group is focused on modeling biodiversity, population dynamics and ecosystem processes, and using these models to make predictions for ecological systems in dynamically changing environments across multiple spatial and temporal scales. His lab also develops tools to simplify working with large heterogeneous datasets and is actively involved in training scientists in advanced computational techniques.

The impact of this work is to improve our understanding of how natural systems work and determine how these systems will change in the future. By building tools that automate time consuming data manipulation tasks and providing training for scientists in computational approaches, this work also makes it possible for scientists to work for efficiently and do better science.

Ethan is the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER 'Young Investigators' Award. He is actively involved in open science and education as a Data Carpentry founder and steering committee member, member of the Impactstory board of directors, the Software Carpentry Advisory Council, the PLOS Data Guidelines Board, and the PeerJ editorial board. Ethan earned his PhD from the University of New Mexico in Biology and also trained at the University of Arizona and the University of California - Merced.

More information:

Google Scholar Profile

Lab Group on GitHub

ORCID: 0000-0001-6728-7745

 
 

related links

Data-Driven Discovery Science University of Florida, Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Back