For better experience, JavaScript is recommended for this website. Enable JavaScript in your browser
Menu

In The News

Newsroom

In The News

Special Projects in Science

Antarctic lake mission reports historic breakthrough

By Quirin Schiermeier Nature January 28, 2013

The more than 300 lakes discovered in the last couple of decades beneath the mighty Antarctic ice sheet have been sealed from the outside world for probably several million years. Today, a team of US Antarctic researchers proudly announced they have accessed one of the last unexplored frontiers on Earth....

Raising devils in seclusion

By Carl Zimmer New York Times January 21, 2013

In November, a team of biologists journeyed to Maria Island, three miles off the Australian island state of Tasmania, taking with them 15 plastic cylinders. They loaded the cylinders into S.U.V.’s, drove them to an abandoned farm and scattered them in the fields.

Before long 15 Tasmanian devils emerged from ...

Special Projects in Science

Deep under Antarctica, looking for signs of life

By James Gorman New York Times January 14, 2013

Three major scientific projects set out this season to seek evidence of life in lakes deep under the Antarctic ice — evidence that could provide clues in the search for evidence of life elsewhere in the solar system, perhaps in Mars’s past, or even now under the surface of Enceladus, ...

Marine Microbiology Initiative

New study shows importance of hydrogen as chemosynthetic bacteria's energy source

A new study highlights the importance of hydrogen as an energy source for chemosynthetic bacteria in the deep sea. Surprisingly, this appears to be the case not only near deep-sea hydrothermal vents where there is abundant hydrogen, but also far from vents where the source of hydrogen is unclear. The ...

New study discovers how some corals can resist climate change

January 7, 2013

In a future shaped by climate change, where will ocean life still thrive? Are there heat resistant organisms that can survive a warmer ocean? A recent study from Stanford University published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences opens a window into how some reef-building corals ...

Betty Irene Moore Nursing Initiative

Training the next generation of primary care providers

By Andrew Schwartz Science of Caring January 4, 2013

At the San Francisco VA Medical Center's primary care clinic, nurse practitioners and medical residents are training together in teams in an emerging trend in health care known as patient-centered medical homes.

On a typical day at the clinic, just before 8 a.m. Nurse Practitioner (NP) student Jonathan Van Nuys ...

Microscopic indigestion caught in the act

Dalhousie University December 6, 2012

The Archibald Lab at Dalhousie led a team of researchers from across the globe that decoded the genetic blueprints of two tiny organisms, shedding light on a major feat of evolution.

Key Points: 

  • Photosynthesis is a key process to life on earth that only plants, algae and some bacteria ...
Thirty Meter Telescope

Report backs TMT project

By Peter Sur Hawaii Tribune-Herald December 1, 2012

The Thirty Meter Telescope, in limbo for more than a year, moved a huge step closer to approval with the release Friday of a long-awaited hearing officer's report in support of the University of Hawaii's request to build the giant observatory.  

Read the full article here.

 

Marine Conservation Initiative

Collaboration helps improve journalists’ and scientists’ skills in communicating about ocean acidification

November 28, 2012

With support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Ocean Conservancy has been working in collaboration with COMPASS and Sustainable Fisheries Partnership to help journalists and scientists communicate more effectively about ocean acidification science and solutions. Read below for two stories that were aided by this partnership, both about a ...

New video highlights grantee’s work to study coral resilience

September 18, 2012
With support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the National Science Foundation, Dr. John Pringle and his team at Stanford have been working to understand how corals resist stress. To develop hypotheses about coral stress, Dr. Pringle’s group is first studying sea anemones, which are evolutionary cousins of ...